Florian Roithmayr: something infinitely distant and strange.

There needs to be at least two elements for an interaction to occur. This space for dialogue created by encounter between different materials is of great concern in Florian Roithmayr’s work. What defines relationships between them? How do they interact?

The utterly strange shapes can remind one of coral reef, with their shattered borders and micro landscape of slopes and cavities. Roithmayr’s working method is partially subtractive - he uses building foam and inserts in into plaster moulds. Once the plaster is dry, the foam is removed in a long and tedious process and the final effect is a commemoration to this intimate encounter between materials.

The sculptures seem to be particularly fragile by juxtaposition with the durability of another material, such as metal or wood. Their structures and visual components are dependent on their interactions. Present, when they oppose each other and are supported by the invisible laws of physics and physical traces of their past interactions.

Florian Roithmayr, something infinitely distant and strange. Photography by Original&theCopy. Courtesy of the artist and Tenderpixel, London.

 Florian Roithmayr, something infinitely distant and strange. Photography by Original&theCopy. Courtesy of the artist and Tenderpixel, London.

Florian Roithmayr, something infinitely distant and strange. Photography by Original&theCopy. Courtesy of the artist and Tenderpixel, London.

Roithmayr’s works address the questions of tangibility and physical interaction, but his preoccupation with repetition and time resonates through them as well. Their materiality echoes repetitive processes of doing the same thing over and over again. In doing so, recycling used material and engaging in repetitive acts, arises a possibility for new interpretations. At times, they can be neatly put into words, but sometimes they are “something infinitely distant and strange”, and need to be experienced.

Maria Cynkier